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Monday, February 29, 2016

Pirates of the sexy kind, and a word about research #RB4U #MFRWauthor

Research – Bane or Boon?

For most authors the need to research is either a love or hate relationship, at least in my experience. There are those writers, and I am one of them, who feel that research is an integral part of telling a good story. The old adage about writing what you know isn’t as cut and dried as it can sometimes appear, but in the end, the more you know about your setting, customs, political atmosphere, and simple geography can make your story go from pop to fizz the moment someone spots the errors.

Realistically, we are none of us perfect storytellers, we make allowances, take liberties with locale and language and a myriad of other things. If you acknowledge those devices your readers will understand you are taking creative license to tell your story, and if the story is one they like, it’ll be forgiven. If you come across as simply too lazy or indifferent to learn the layout of your world, those same readers will roast your artistic ass until you cry. They will see it as an insult to their intelligence if you think you can fool them, or worse, talk down to them by pretending it doesn’t matter. It does. A lot!

The other side of this argument is that sometimes to make the story work, to serve it best, you have to allow the imagination freedom. Nothing in this world is etched in stone, except perhaps monuments. A creative liberty that makes your story flow and thereby come to life with a bit of magic and mystique, is certainly acceptable to readers and other authors. Research will help you shape the mythos you need for your creation. That doesn’t mean you get to reorganize the known world, but if you rearrange a distance in a city to make your plot flow more smoothly, and you acknowledge that, you’re not likely to get the citizens of that city ragging on your book telling you you’re an idiot who can’t read.

Apart from making your story more authentic in tone, research can often lead you to ideas you might never have entertained otherwise. Often, it is in the small details of research that you find gems to mine for your tale. Use them! Readers love the little details that flesh out a story and make it zing. I’ve written a couple of novels in which the backdrop was Victorian London of Jack the Ripper era. The murders are fascinating to read about, even though they are of course gruesome in detail. However, if you look at some of the facts, and marry it to the myth, you can find a wealth of unrelated material upon which to base stories. That’s a reality for most notorious events in history if you’re using them as a backdrop of any kind.

I’ve seen a lot of argument and discussion about “pantsters vs. plotters” but nothing makes a stronger case for plotting than the research you need for some stories. Historical books require realistic background, and social rules of the day. Fantasy worlds need to be built from the ground up, and that means you have to create religious cultures, political situations and climates, if there are intrigues driving your storyline, they have to been carefully presented and understood by your audience. ALL of this goes back to research.

So, is the research a bane to your creative muse, or the boon? That is as varied as the authors we read, but in my opinion only–you can’t have a story that lives and breathes for people if you don’t do the homework before you begin the writing process. The words flow better, like a river, if they know what direction to go. Meandering might be fun for a while, but too much of it gets you–and your readers–lost in a sea of confusion. And, that gets both annoying and betraying to the audience that’s invested their time and money into your ability to entertain them for a time. I think that’s a thing worth consideration, and a bit of invested time on the part of writers who care about their stories, and their readers. It’s a bit like a sacred trust to the readers who return over and over to buy our books.

PIRATES
* Best-seller *


Three stories, one kind of hero, pirates anyone? Includes the short stories:

Angel-Fire: A short intro to the world of Captain Jack Stanton, an honourable man with a tarnished reputation. Stranded in Nassau, caught up in a pleasant interlude with a barmaid, Jack has a vision that will lead him to his past and his future, if he can survive to get back Tortuga to discover what it all means…

Storm-Singer: The Isle of Nyx has become the dread of all sailors who must dare the waters surrounding the mythical island. Local legends say a vampire prince resides in the ancient castle that can be seen from the harbor of the island. At his side is a powerful sorceress whose song can control and summon storms.
In a desperate attempt to end the eternal threat looming over them, the people of the Aurora Islands sacrifice their greatest treasure, the princess Sarita, entrusting her with the task of seducing and destroying the dark prince who has been plundering their wealth and their people for centuries?

The Phantom’s Lair: Upon her arrival in the pirate port of Tortuga where her father is acting as Governor, Katheryn Hollinsworth is determined to choose her own path, and follow her heart wherever it may take her. On the streets of Puerta de la Plata, she encounters the mythical buccaneer known as The Phantom, and very quickly loses her heart to the handsome rogue.


Jack Stanton is a man who has never fully come to terms with his past, and in the Governor's pretty daughter he finds a most unlikely champion. But when his past threatens her life, and any chance of a respectable future, The Phantom must face the demons of his past, and accept the dictates of his own reawakened heart...


11 comments:

Sam Cheever said...

I'm one of those authors who hates research. I see it as time taken away from my writing. But I also realize the value/necessity and feel really good when I've done the necessary reading and interviewing. As an added bonus, I've discovered some really cool plot devices in the details of my research. So, do I hate it? Yes, definitely. But do I do it anyway because I recognize the value? Yep! I eat my veggies before I grab dessert. To do otherwise would be a slap in the face to my readers. Thanks for the great post, Denyse!

Cara Marsi said...

Your story sounds great, Denyse. I enjoy research, but the reason I don't write historical romance is there's too much research involved. And God help you if you get historical details wrong. The readers will pick that up. When I wrote my werewolf story I did tons of research on the werewolf myth. It was fun and I learned some interesting facts I was able to use in my story. Thanks for an interesting post.

Denysé Bridger said...

I tend to love research, sometimes to the point that I get so involved I end up changing entire story plots. Like Sam, I find a lot of details and diversions that add wonderful layers to a story, so it's rewarding in unexpected ways. I've always enjoyed historical fiction more than contemporary, although in recent years I seem to write more contemporary than anything else... probably just a phase.

Thanks for stopping by, ladies. Have a great "Leap Year 29th!)

Paris said...

I love research and happily stumble over more facts that I think I will possibly need but that's part of the charm. Something that may seem irrelevant at the time might end up being what moves the plot forward in my story. Dusty bookstores and libraries are still some of my favorite places to explore. These days I'm more apt to be focused on a time period for my historical research but every once in a while, I find a treasure that I just know I'll need, someday. My idea of time well spent:)

jean hart stewart said...

Interesting column...I love research and more or less assumed every writer did. I learn so much about other times that I never knew...

Melissa Keir said...

I love research when it's something that I'm excited about. I can see both sides of the coin. Thanks for sharing your thoughts!

Helen Henderson said...

I too love research. Especially the in-person kind. The only problems? Having to force myself to stop and return to the world of today and to remind myself not to use everything I've learned. Happy researching all.

Diane Burton said...

I love research, but it can get me into trouble. I'll be looking up one thing then I find a link to something that sounds interesting and then another link and so on. But I'd rather check out the facts than make a major blunder.

Judy Baker said...

I'm a researcher too. I enjoy it, sometimes too much and have to force myself to stop and write. Thanks for sharing.

vicki batman said...

Hi, Denyse! I'm a pantser and have to do research, too. The little details make the story more real to the reader.

Denysé Bridger said...

Seems we ALL get hung up on the all the hidden gems we encounter as we research our work. I know there are times when an entire subplot can take a whole new turn when I find something that works better, or streamlines things... so much reading to do!! Thanks for all your input, everyone. Blessings to you all, D

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