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Friday, January 9, 2015

Sometimes We Grow Up and Still Fall for Children's Books!


Sometimes We Grow Up and Still Fall for Children's Books!

Sadly, I'm an adult. Old enough to vote, drink and know better. I've learned things the hard way and there's even photos out there somewhere (thankfully we didn't have the internet when I was younger) to prove it.
1980's Day when when I taught 4/5th grade
As a teacher, I get to read and enjoy a lot of different children's books. Children's books that made me weep and children's books that made me laugh. And most of which, I've fallen in love with...even going so far as to buy books for presents for my students, my nieces and nephews and... okay... myself! A girl can NEVER have too many books!

Three of my favorite children's picture books are one's I've bought myself. Each for very unique reasons. 

Bad Day at Riverbend is a hilarious by Chris Van Allsburg. He's written Jumanji and The Mysteries of Harris Burdick, but it's Bad Day that always gets the kids thinking. The story tells the tale of a mysterious problem that comes upon a town one day. The sheriff sets out to try to stop it. I won't spoil the ending for you... but it will leave you smiling!


 Bigfoot Cinderella is also a funny tale but more importantly, it is one that you must read aloud. The words have their own unique sounds to them as we see a fun twist on the classic fairy tale of Cinderella. In this case, Cinderella is a bigfoot who wants to protect the forest, rather than harm it like her evil stepsisters. *Hint...if you love twisted fairy tales, there's so many from Dinorella to The Rough Faced Girl.**

My all time favorite book has to be this one......and I dare you to read it without crying.
In Faithful Elephants we learn about the other losses from war. In this case, three elephants from a Japanese zoo teach us about what true friendship is and how there are two sides to every piece of history. You will never think about war in the same way.

I'd love to hope that throughout my years teaching, I've inspired a few students to fall in love with a book. I'd also love to know that I shared my own love of reading with my students and encouraged them to find laughter, sadness or learning in a book... and that even picture books are to be treasured as an adult. 

Do you have any picture books that you still love or read? Do you have a book that you've shared with your children and/or grandchildren? I'd love to hear about it and add them to my TBR pile!

Thank you for sharing a piece of your day with me. If you want to know more about the books I've written or about myself, please check out my blog at www.melissakeir.com. Until next month... Keep reading!!

17 comments:

Sandy said...

Melissa, what an excellent post. We're never too old to enjoy children's books. I used to keep some around for the grandkids, but then I gave them away.

Tina Donahue said...

Great post, Melissa. I recall the first book I read from a real library when I was a kid - Mystery in Old Quebec. The librarian, who seemed like a thousand years old at the time (but was probably only 40 or so), said I'd love it.

I can still recall the author's description of how the firelight played on the walls of the room (I believe the wallpaper was peeling - at least that's how I recall it in my mind).

I really loved this book and couldn't wait to read more. :)

Nancy Gideon said...

I loved fairytales and Dr.Suess(much to my mom's dismay) and went to bed every night with a story. Did the same for my kids and my daughter-in-law continues the tradition w my grandson. That trip into the imagination is something that never gets old or forgotten.

Molly Daniels said...

LOL....I've spent a week at my mom's the past several months and have been rereading the kiddie books in my old bookcase. One was Merry, Rose, and Christmas Tree June, about a child's love for her 'unpretty' doll, and shows that love isn't about being beautiful and perfect on the outside. I can't remember the author.

Another thing I've been doing is systematically rereading all my Archie, Family Circle, Peanuts, and Richie Rich comic books:)

Cara Marsi said...

Hi, Melissa. I love your post. I've never heard of the books you mention, but they sound really good. I used to read Goodnight Moon and Harold the Purple Crayon to my son when he was very little. I loved them both, but I really loved The Runaway Bunny.

When he was a young teen, my son gave me a copy of I Am the Cheese because he knew I liked to read and he thought I'd enjoy that one. That was an interesting book, but the fact that my son gave it to me makes it special.

Patricia Kiyono said...

Hi Melissa. Since I spent 28 years teaching elementary school, you can bet I've got lots of favorites, and gave many away. I got rid of a lot of my library when I retired, but I'm so glad I kept several of the best ones to read aloud to my grandkids now! At the top of the list is Love You Forever by Robert Munsch (I still have trouble getting through the second to last page), and for chapter nothing beats The Boxcar Children.

D'Ann said...

Can't think of any picture books, but I loved the Black Stallion and Nancy Drew and still have most of them in storage!

Judy Baker said...

I've always had a secret wish that I could write a children's book. I think they take special imaginative writers. Thanks for sharing such a good post to remind us of so many good children's books out there.

Kristen Brockmeyer said...

I've recently re-read the Little House on the Prairie books and Anne of Green Gables. I love the Narnia books, too and have read those a million times. But I wish I could get my hands on the original Wizard of Oz series, by L. Frank Baum -- my elementary school library had an old set and I still remember how beautiful the 1920's and '30's illustrations were.

Diane Burton said...

I loved the Nancy Drew & Pollyanna books. They were my mom's when she was a kid. As a teacher, I read to my class everyday. That's how I got to read The Hobbit and Wrinkle in Time. As an adult, I've loved the Hunger Games and Divergent series. As a grandma, I love reading the Pigeon books by Mo Willems (Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus, etc.) to my grandkiddies. Even the 7 y.o. still giggles.

Loralee said...

One of my favorites was Heidi. I loved the fact that she lived on a mountain with her grandfather. Reading about Switzerland was exciting. Of course, Nancy Drew was another favorite as well as Black Beauty and the Cherry Ames, Nurse series. I can't imagine growing up without a library card and books.

vicki batman said...

Hi, Melissa: I haven't ready any children's books in a while. My kids loved Dr. Seuss and I memorized several of them because of repetition. They loved the Teacher from the Black Lagoon, The Librarian, etc. The Golly Sisters, and Captain Underpants. Goodnight Moon. I saved a bunch just in case one day....

Paris said...

Melissa,

Wonderful posts and it did remind me of reading to my little ones. Dr. Seuss and Shel Silverstein were two of their favorites and mine.

jean hart stewart said...

I've recently been astounded by The Outsiders, really a youth book, but I'd not read, but my granddaughter asked me to read it and I'm so glad I did. Still adore Dr. Suess! Read every Nancy Drew I could get my hands on.

Lucy Naylor Kubash said...

What a great, post, Melissa! My kids loved the Richard Scary books and the character of Lowly Worm. I think I still have some of them. Other books we read were Bunnicula and the Celery Stalks at Midnight. Favorites from my own childhood included Black Beauty, Nancy Drew, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn,and Little Women. One book I remember reading to my daughter was The Ghost on Saturday Night. It was something we picked up at a garage sale and we read it so many times it finally fell apart. It was a funny little story, and I'll have to see if it's still available on Amazon.

darlene deluca said...

I love lots of children's books, some from my childhood, and others that I found when my kids were little. We still get out Angelina's Christmas and Little House in The Big Woods at Christmas. And on occasion, I'll re-read some Laura Ingalls Wilder just for fun!

Melissa Keir said...

Thank you all for stopping by. I recognize so many of the books that you mention. I use children's books like these for bigger lessons, esp character lessons. Molly Lou Mellon or Ruby the Copycat are great ones to teach not only young children but also adults about how words hurt and how to move past those pieces of pain.

My students just finished Bunnicula- a Rabbit Tale of Mystery and we are currently reading 4th Grade Rats. <3 Love reading aloud to my kiddos, even when they can read to themselves!

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