All blogs are property of authors and copying is not permitted.

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Where The Wild Horses Are...



Beach time is a favorite way to spend summer vacation. As we make plans to get away, here is an idea for those who’d like to reconnect with the power of nature. If you're feeling the need to reclaim your wild inner child… add wild horses to your beach escape.


                      5 Wild Spanish Mustangs—Corolla, NC—June 28, 2007 by Kevincollins123



Nothing quite captures the essence of freedom and sparks joy deep within us like the vision of wild horses racing down an otherwise deserted beach. These free spirits inspire us to tap into our own wild, free core. Be ready for a soul-stirring and awe-inspiring experience.

Historical and modern romance authors--especially those who write Western romances--often write about horses. A horse has starred in many famous novels for children and teens of all ages.

Wikipedia states that in 1971, US Congress recognized the mustang as ‘…living symbols of the historic and pioneering spirit of the West…”. Today, they are entrusted to the Bureau of Land Management and protected by US law.

Wild horses are more commonly known as feral horses. More than half the mustang population is found in Nevada, with large numbers also in Wyoming, Montana and Oregon. The Atlantic coast is the other most likely area to find them. Here are some (but not all) of the best places to see these pillars of strength and freedom.

The CBS Sunday Morning News recently presented a segment about Cumberland Island, an enchanting island just off the coast of Georgia, where wild horses roam and outnumber the human population. The original horses arrived along with the Spaniards in the 1500s. Historically, Cumberland Island was a cotton plantation prior to the Civil War. Later, it became the private retreat of the famous Carnegie family. In 1972 they sold and gave most of their land to the National Park Service, creating Cumberland Island National Sea Shore. This is where John F Kennedy Jr. married Carolyn Bessette, in a small shack of a church built by freed slaves.

Another place you can find herds of wild horses is the seashore where Maryland and Virginia meet at Assateague Island and Chincoteaque. The two herds found here – one in each state – are probably the best known to tourists. On the Virginia side, there is an annual salt water round up and pony swim that takes place every July before the auction where most of the foals are sold to manage the herd size. The Maryland herd roams free and their population is kept under control by selected mares being shot with a dart vaccine that keeps them from getting pregnant.


                    Wild Pony at Assateague Island National Seashore, MD, June 27, 2007 by dbking



In North Carolina, there are four parks where you can watch wild horses:
~Corolla on the Currituck Outer Banks, where wild horses roam free and you can drive along the beach to view them.
~Ocracoke Island, where the herd has dwindled to less than two dozen horses. These 'ponies' are far from wild anymore. They are fed twice daily and receive veterinary treatments. A visit to the Pony Pen can be fun.
~Shackleford Banks, Cape Lookout, is an island three miles offshore. It is cut off from the mainland and accessible only by ferry. Over 100 wild horses roam here and a visit to this island is said to be highly satisfying for wild horse watchers.
~Rachel Carson Coastal Reserve is a series of islands where you can see wild horses galloping along the beach. You can get to the island by ferry, or enjoy a boat tour around the island.


Nevada has a number of locations where you can enjoy wild horses. A very informative website with tips and locations is animaltourism.com/animals/horse.php.

Who knows, the wild horses may inspire you with a plot involving horses while you are there. Enjoy your summer and keep these safety tips in mind no matter what sort of vacation you plan: stay hydrated, don’t get sunburned, and be safe in the water.


GEMMA JULIANA is a multi-published author who lives in an enchanted cottage in north Texas with her handsome hero, teen son and a comical dog. She loves making new friends and hearing from readers. Exotic coffee and chocolate fuel her creativity. You can buy Gemma’s books on Amazon.  

Connect with Gemma


17 comments:

Rose Gorham said...

I enjoyed reading your post Gemma. I am so glad there are places where horse can run free. Thanks for sharing.

Rose Anderson said...

Gemma, what a great post! I once saw a movie about the Chincoteaque pony swim. Now there's a nice tidbit for a novel. Thanks for sharing. :) Enjoy your vacation.

Melissa Keir said...

I have always wanted to see the wild horses. They are a dream of mine and I love horses in general. But there's something about wild animals who have been untouched by the hand of man.

I was saddened to hear about the decline of some of the herds. I hope that isn't an indicator of problems for the horses or their habitat.

Paris said...

As a child, I enjoyed any novel that included horses and I still love them (that would be horses and books:). There is something about watching wild horses run free that is still inspiring. Thanks for the wonderful post. I think I'll go watch "Hildago" now:)

Tina Donahue said...

Wonderful post, Gemma. I love animals. Most of the time, I like them more than people. :)

Gemma Juliana said...

Rose G, I've wondered for such a long time where to find wild horses and am happy to know there are several locations left for them still.

Gemma Juliana said...

Hi Rose, Wild horses would be a wonderful tidbit in a novel. It's just not something we tend to think about, but there are so many ways to weave them into a story. Thanks for stopping by!

Gemma Juliana said...

Melissa, I've also always wanted to see wild horses. I framed a jigsaw puzzle that hangs in my bathroom... a ghostly white horse galloping along the shoreline beneath a full moon. This is one of the most inspiring 'paintings' I've ever owned.

Gemma Juliana said...

Paris, so glad the blog post reminded you of your love for wild horses. Thanks for the movie tip, I'll have to check out the movie 'Hildago'...

Gemma Juliana said...

Tina, you made me laugh! I know many people who prefer animals to people, and some days I feel the same way. Have a great day.

jean hart stewart said...

Interesting post..thanks. I purely lovely new information that grabs me...

Gemma Juliana said...

Hi Jean, Thanks for stopping by. I learn more from blog posts these days than anywhere else.

Cara Marsi said...

How interesting! Thank you. I've been to Chincoteaque. I visit Nevada often and I'll have to find those horses.

Gemma Juliana said...

Hi Cara,
Primm isn't too far from Las Vegas, I understand, and that's where many wild horses roam. Maybe the website link will help you find some near the area where you go.

Sandy said...

Gemma, I love your post on wild horses. As a child I read Black Beauty, and I have a love for horses wild or not.

I'm with Tina when it comes to liking animals more than people sometimes. lol

Gemma Juliana said...

Hi Sandy, I read Black Beauty as a girl, too, and almost mentioned it in my post. It's a timeless book. Thanks for stopping by!

Fran Lee said...

I have friends who go Mustang hunting (with cameras!)in Utah's West desert area near the Nevada border. These horses seldom ever see a human, and are very difficult to get within camera range, but somehow they bring back the greatest photos of mares and new foals, even a stallion fight. I grew up in a town where a small herd of wild ones would come down from the mountain to snack on people's vegetable gardens. Love 'em!

Share buttons